Tag Archives: Statistics Canada

Minister Doug Currie negotiating new funding formula with Ottawa

Seniors and Social Services Minister Doug Currie, Statistics Canada unreliable
Seniors and Social Services Minister Doug Currie, Statistics Canada unreliable

Previous reliance on Statistics Canada appears to be negotiable

Continue reading Minister Doug Currie negotiating new funding formula with Ottawa

Disabled unemployment may exceed 15% in Canada

click for larger image
click for larger image

Disabled unemployment in Canada is 53% higher than non-disabled workers – where are the Federal HRDC programs to address this issue?

PROLOG Disabled unemployment may exceed 15% in Canada

In 2006 the rate of unemployment for the disabled in Canada was 10.4% but with the recession that is estimated to be greater than 14.7%.

Where are the Federal HRDC programs to address this issue?

The disabled are usually the last hired and the first fired in a downturn.

Even those numbers are low since they only represent the disabled actively looking for work. The real unemployment rate among the disabled approaches 30%.

Continue reading Disabled unemployment may exceed 15% in Canada

Why doesn’t CBC report the real news

PEI Unemployment story is bogus

Employment on PEI Feb 2009
Employment on PEI Feb 2009

Story from CBC Charlottetown

CBC Charlottetown has to be one of the worst news organizations I’ve seen.

CBC are “rip and read” artists.

The reporters take stories off the internet and just read them on camera like that’s all it takes.

Holland College journalism students could do their jobs.

This week the government announced the unemployment numbers on Tuesday and CBC National first reported how bad it is – 1.3 million unemployed – then dropped to the less dramatic story of 560,000 collecting unemployment benefits. Continue reading Why doesn’t CBC report the real news

Islanders still spending but for how long?

By Stephen Pate
NJN Network News
January 15, 2009

The Globe and Mail carries a Canadian Press story New vehicle sales dropped in November, Statscan reports “New motor vehicle sales fell 7 per cent in November to 129,044, the largest monthly decline since August, 2005.Statistics Canada attributes most of the decrease to lower sales of passenger cars. Prince Edward Island recorded a small increase in the number of new motor vehicles sold.”

In a recession or depression, cash is king.

PEI car sales have not dropped and that is lagging the rest of Canada and certainly North America in feeling the effects of the recession / depression. Our economy is, to a great extent, based on government spending and Federal largess. So much of PEI’s middle class incomes are related to government jobs both direct and indirect.
Continue reading Islanders still spending but for how long?

Americans With a Disability Reaches 54.4 Million

The US Census Bureau announced on December 18th that 54 million Americans have a disability.

“About one in five U.S. residents – 19 percent – reported some level of disability in 2005, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released today. These 54.4 million Americans are roughly equal to the combined total populations of California and Florida.” says the press release.

“Among those with a disability, 35 million, or 12 percent of the population, were classified as having a severe disability, according to Americans With Disabilities: 2005.”

“Nearly half (46 percent) of people age 21 to 64 with a disability were employed, compared with 84 percent of people in this age group without a disability. Among those with disabilities, 31 percent with severe disabilities and 75 percent with non severe disabilities were employed. People with difficulty hearing were more likely to be employed than those with difficulty seeing (59 percent compared with 41 percent).

“A portion of people with disabilities — 11 million age 6 and older — needed personal assistance with everyday activities. These activities include such tasks as getting around inside the home, taking a bath or shower, preparing meals and performing light housework.”

14% of Canadians are reported by Statistics Canada as disabled.

Close the gap on the needy – Disabled need help


To the Editor
September 17, 2008

The Provincial government’s Disability Services Review report was released this week. Thirty eight pages long, it is silent on the needs of Islanders with disabilities for wheelchairs, walkers, hearing aids and other disability aids. Who are they? How many people need help? What kind of help do they need?

According to Statistics Canada as of June, 4,300 Islanders with disabilities need specialized equipment. The Disability Support Program only helps 1,100 Islanders. With 4,300 more Islanders that need help, one wonders why the 11 people who wrote the report did not tell us.   Continue reading Close the gap on the needy – Disabled need help

Silence on the needs of disabled persons from Disabilities Review

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Editor:

The provincial government’s Disability Services Review report was released last week. Thirty-eight pages long, it is silent on the needs of Islanders with disabilities for wheelchairs, walkers, hearing aids and other disability aids. Who are they? How many people need help? What kind of help do they need?

According to Statistics Canada, as of June, 4,300 Islanders with disabilities need specialized equipment. The Disability Support Program only helps 1,100 Islanders. With 4,300 more Islanders that need help, one wonders why the 11 people who wrote the report did not tell us.

Islanders need 1,400 hearing and 300 vision aids. Wheelchairs or other mobility aids are needed by 1,100 Islanders. Agility aids are needed by 410 people. 1,200 Islanders who suffer from a pain disability need help. Learning aids are needed by another 210 Islanders.  Continue reading Silence on the needs of disabled persons from Disabilities Review

The Government needs to get the message – Seniors and the rising costs of basics


LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Editor:

The press conference of President Eric Hammill of the P.E.I. Senior Citizens Federation on Friday covered in The Guardian pointed out the serious problems seniors face with rising costs. He said seniors on P.E.I. are in desperate need of basic necessities.

Some of the basic needs Hammill pointed out are assistive devices for seniors with disabilities. According to Statistics Canada, 9,000seniors on P.E.I. have a disability as of 2006. That’s almost half of all seniors.
Continue reading The Government needs to get the message – Seniors and the rising costs of basics

Childrens’ needs are unconscionable

Letters to the Editor – Eastern Graphic

Of 12,000 Islanders with disabilities, 4,300 or 33 per cent have unmet needs for specialized equipment according to Statistics Canada June 3 report PALS 2006.

PALS 2006 is a survey conducted after the 5-year census to develop a profile of the disability population in Canada.

Those 15 to 64 years of age had 45 per cent of their needs for assistive devices unmet. Seniors had slightly lower needs.

230 children on PEI have unmet needs for special devices. The need among children is unconscionable and the direct result of a penny-pinching government that spends its money on cocktail parties.

A total of 55 per cent of persons with very severe disabilities had unmet needs for specialized equipment, which was the highest for all levels of disability. Mild or moderate levels of disability have lower needs for equipment which are easily met. A mild mobility disability may only require a cane while a severe mobility disability would require an electric wheelchair and home modifications.

Types of disabilities surveyed were hearing, seeing, communication, pain, learning, agility and mobility. Agility means difficulty with bending, dressing, grasping objects and reaching. Mobility includes difficulty walking a half a kilometer, up and down a flight of stairs or 12 steps, or walking carrying an object of 10 lbs or more.

Disabilities limit the participation in everyday life by more than 50 per cent for those with mobility, agility and pain disabilities.

Nearly three quarters of people with a hearing disability still reported the need for hearing aids. One third of those with seeing disabilities reported needing large print reading materials. One third of those with mobility disabilities need lift devices and the same number with agility disabilities need hand or arm braces.

Only 11 per cent of needs are paid from the public purse on PEI. We know this from the fact that only 1,100 of PEI’s 22,000 persons with disabilities are covered under the DSP. Most needs on PEI are met from the disabled person’s own resources or family.

High cost of assistive devices was cited by more than 63 per cent of Islanders for not getting the device they need which is higher than the national average. When will the government wake up and start funding this program properly.

The PALS survey is our only way of knowing the true problems of Islanders with disabilities since the government is in denial. Last year the Deputy Minister of Social Services and Seniors told me Statistics Canada wasn’t accurate, it couldn’t be trusted. The government wants to minimize the problem that Islanders with disabilities need help.

Stephen Pate
PEI Disability Alert,
Charlottetown

Low Income Cut Off – LICO what is it?

Statistics Canada uses the term Low Income Cut-Off or LICO. What does it mean?

Illustration Make Poverty History

Essentially LICO is a statistical number that defines where poverty ends. It is based on where you live and the size of your family. It is not an exact science; however it does help government to determine if one is living above or below the statistical poverty line.

LICO is calculated for urban and rural areas. Sometimes as in today’s Guardian, it is shown in after-tax income. The 2006 table below is before taxes, a number that most people can calculate from their wages or income.   Continue reading Low Income Cut Off – LICO what is it?