Category Archives: Social Programs

CARLOS OSORIO / TORONTO STAR

Rights of Canadians With Disabilities Affirmed by Supreme Court

Should doctors or family members have the right to decide when to pull the plug on a disabled patient? The Supreme Court has decided doctors do not have the right. Continue reading

Cathy Hayward

McMaster University Against PhD Student in Ontario Human Rights Tribunal

McMaster PhD candidate says McMaster failed to provide reasonable accommodation for his cognitive disability

McMaster health sciences
McMaster University going before Ontario Human Rights on disability accommodation complaint (photo McMaster)

“On Friday, July 19 2013 the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario will begin hearing the disability discrimination claim brought against McMaster University by former PhD student, Jason Tang.” ARCH

The demonstrable failure of McMaster is to stand their ground and not allow Mr. Tang a reasonable accommodation required by law.

McMaster had several opportunities along the way to mediate this dispute.

The second failure of the Canadian Human Rights system is that Mr. Tang has to sue the university on his own without government support. Continue reading

Substance Abuse PEI 2011

PEI’s hysterical pain-killer epidemic

The past two weeks has seen the PEI Health Minister clutching at the pain-killer abuse story with the local media parroting his words

Substance Abuse PEI 2011
Substance abuse on PEI – alcohol tops the list with marijuana 2nd and all other illicit drugs a distant 3rd

According to PEI’s Minister of Health and the local media, Prince Edward Island has a “painkiller epidemic” but it just ain’t so.

We do know is that if the Province makes it harder to get prescription pain killers PEI’s 25,000 persons living with disabilities will suffer. Pain is the one of the most significant problems for the disabled.  Continue reading

Currie-Mayne

Health Minister and Deputy disagree on PEI’s new war on pain killers

Health PEI is starting a smoke screen war on narcotics to divert public attention from closing rural hospitals – the Minister and his Deputy tell two different stories

Currie-Mayne
Health Minister Doug Currie and Deputy Dr. Michael Mayne – two versions of “War on Pain Killers” – a smokescreen?

The announced get-tough stance on prescription of pain killers appears to be a smoke screen to divert attention from hospital closings. It is a phony shadow war at best.

Health Canada reports pain-killer use is dropping across Canada. PEI is on par with the national average.

Where is this “dramatic increase” reported by the Minister, CBC and the Charlottetown Guardian?  Continue reading

doug-currie-press-conference-src

PEI Narcotics Regulations Attack Disabled and Dying

Prince Edward Island’s plans to further restrict legal prescriptions of pain killers will harm the long-term disabled and terminally ill.

doug-currie-press-conference-src
PEI Health Minister Doug Currie promoting new regulations that will harm people with disabilities

The new legislation will limit legal prescriptions for those suffering chronic pain in the terminal stages of life.

Using data from PEI’s maligned health information system, PEI’s Minister of Health plans to limit pain medication for PEI’s 25,000 disabled.

Narcotic pain killers are already highly regulated in Canada and access for people with chronic pain and disabilities can be difficult. New regulations are a likely a smokescreen of other changes in the PEI healthcare system.  Continue reading

Maria was busking to earn bus fare back to Vancouver. She told a long and convoluted tale. A tortured story of mental illness, homelessness and rejection. (Photo Eric Parker Flickr Creative Commons)

How the mentally disabled are lost in the legal system

Without legal aid, people with cognitive and learning disabilities cannot cope with the demands of the law

Maria was busking to earn bus fare back to Vancouver. She told a long and convoluted tale. A tortured story of mental illness, homelessness and rejection. (Photo Eric Parker Flickr Creative Commons)
Maria was busking to earn bus fare back to Vancouver. She told a long and convoluted tale, a tortured story of mental illness, homelessness and rejection. (Photo Eric Parker Flickr Creative Commons)

Canadians with cognitive and learning disabilities are falling through the cracks of Canada’s legal system.

They often lack the skills to deal with details like court dates, the demands for clear thinking and the pace of the courts.

Unless they get legal aid, those living with mental disabilities are not being treated fairly by the Courts or the Human Rights system that are supposed to protect them.

“Individuals who live with cognitive and perceptual impairments need more time to understand what they are facing, what their options are and how to respond,” said Toronto lawyer Sarah Shartal. (Toronto Star)

“Informed consent or informed participation takes talk…it takes time to explain things to people who have difficulty thinking clearly.”

Continue reading